Author Topic: Dry brining vs wet brining  (Read 125 times)

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Offline Hank_Moody

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Dry brining vs wet brining
« Reply #-1 on: January 11, 2018, 05:57:44 PM »
Newbie here. If you brine your birds (turkey/chicken), which brining method to you prefer and why?

Offline Pappymn

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Dry brining vs wet brining
« on: January 11, 2018, 06:24:49 PM »
I've done it both ways. Not sure I can tell the difference. I do like that with dry brining I can get it under the skin. That to me is a clear advantage. Fridge space bring a second advantage


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Offline smokeasaurus

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Re: Dry brining vs wet brining
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2018, 07:18:36 PM »
My chickens come out nice and juicy and I do not brine anymore since I got an airfryer. Now personally I like my chicken to taste like chicken so I can have versatile left over chicken meat.

Be careful not to brine too long. Poultry is a smoke and flavor magnet.

sweetwaterspice has nice brine mixtures to check out. So does spices inc and savory spices.
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Offline smokeasaurus

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Re: Dry brining vs wet brining
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2018, 07:22:03 PM »
This is in our recipe section but I will save you the search.

This my friend you have to try..................trust The Smoke on this one

Hound's Citrus Brined Chicken


Prepare the brine:   1 gallon water      1 cup Kosher salt or 1/2 cup table salt       juice of 3 oranges      juice of three limes

juice of three lemons    rinds from same     1 sliced white onion      1 head of garlic, crushed      stems from a bunch of

cilantro, chopped       serranos to taste, minimum of 4       rough ground cumin and coriander 2 Tbsp each      1/4 cup chili

powder or any ground chile you prefer     (1/4 cup onion powder is optional)      (1/4cup garlic powder is optional)  Place the

bird(s) and plenty of brine solution in a ziploc bag(s) and leave refrigerated overnight prior to cooking. A cooler works fine

also.  I use a 5 gal beverage cooler for all but the biggest turkeys.  Frozen soda bottles or ice can be used to keep the cold.

{8 lbs of ice= 1 gallon of water}   An hour before cooking take the bird out and thoroughly wash it down with cold water for

at least 30 seconds.  You can place aromatics like garlic heads, apples, citrus in the cavity of the bird for the cooking.  I like

also to place orange slices between skin and meat.    Smoke rear end of chicken toward the fire for 45 minutes/lb @ 225°F

until the thigh is about 170°F.  You can rotate as necessary to avoid charring.  Cooking this way will result in inedible skin, but

juicy chicken.  If you like the crispy skin then place the chicken  near the firebox.  This works for either chickens or turkeys.  If

you eliminate the brine (salt and water) the rest of the recipe makes an excellent marinade for grilled chicken.  (Recipe

courtesy of Cuchulain Libby, a.k.a. Hound.)  (Editor's note:  this method sounds crazy and the brine looks terrible, but IT

WORKS!  You won't believe it is chicken.  Flakes apart like fish.  You must try this and it works on turkey .)
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Offline TentHunteR

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Re: Dry brining vs wet brining
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 08:18:14 PM »
I've done it both ways. Not sure I can tell the difference. I do like that with dry brining I can get it under the skin. That to me is a clear advantage. Fridge space bring a second advantage

That pretty much sums it up for me too.  I don't brine birds very often, but when I do it's usually a dry brine with a little salt under the skin where it can more easily penetrate the meat.  I don't do a heavy salting, just enough to season it a bit.
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Offline Ka Honu

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Re: Dry brining vs wet brining
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2018, 09:55:38 PM »
I've done it both ways. Not sure I can tell the difference. I do like that with dry brining I can get it under the skin. That to me is a clear advantage. Fridge space bring a second advantage

That pretty much sums it up for me too.  I don't brine birds very often, but when I do it's usually a dry brine with a little salt under the skin where it can more easily penetrate the meat.  I don't do a heavy salting, just enough to season it a bit.

What they said. I rarely brine chicken but always turkey.
Everyone is entitled to my opinion

Offline Hank_Moody

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Re: Dry brining vs wet brining
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2018, 10:21:40 PM »
Thanks everyone for the feedback.

Smokeasaurus - I’m definitely going to have to try this recipe. Thanks!