Author Topic: Brining Poultry  (Read 5289 times)

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Offline teesquare

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #14 on: November 09, 2014, 07:57:40 AM »
I like zipper seal aspect of those LVC.


(But I think their picture is not doing their customers any favors. The bird is not submerged in the brine. I know - it is something we should all know...But will bet most folks pay more attention to pictures than words when using a product. :D )
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Offline RAD

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #15 on: November 09, 2014, 08:49:17 AM »
I was looking for some food safe buckets for brining and went to Publix and they gave me the bakery buckets. All I had to do was clean them. Man my tongue  was sore.  :o



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Offline CaptJack

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #16 on: November 09, 2014, 12:57:13 PM »
the brining bag from Reynolds is less than $2 and on the shelf with the aluminum foil in your local grocery store

it's important to put the bird breast side down to the bottom of the bag if you want proper brining
once the wings are submerged, you don't need to submerge the back since you're not going to eat it
and I didn't have any problem sliding this in a shelf in my fridge for the over-night brine



btw- I used just PLAIN Salt (no iodine), instead of Kosher salt. and just plain white sugar in the brine
and the brine, juiciness of the meat was outstanding
I also added Mrs.Dash, tyme, & sage. which I ran through my spice grinder to dust before I added it to the salt & sugar
and I didn't boil it. I just mixed it cold (1-quart mix) and poured it in the bag with the bird. then added tap water to the level I wanted.
the brine was about 14 hours before I put the bird in the OldSmokey
« Last Edit: November 09, 2014, 08:31:33 PM by CaptJack »
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Offline akruckus

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #17 on: November 10, 2014, 09:14:24 AM »
In the past I have used a food grade 5 gallon bucket and loaded it with ice, or used a smaller cooler with ice as well.  There has always still been ice in the bucket when I get the turkey the next day day and a half.  Usually sits in the garage to keep it cool as well, depending on the weather forecast for Philly of course.

We are doing a fried turkey but I think I am going to smoke some sea salt and use that in the brine to see if it gets a good smoky flavor inside the meat.
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Offline Pam Gould

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #18 on: November 10, 2014, 09:24:26 AM »
In the past I have used a food grade 5 gallon bucket and loaded it with ice, or used a smaller cooler with ice as well.  There has always still been ice in the bucket when I get the turkey the next day day and a half.  Usually sits in the garage to keep it cool as well, depending on the weather forecast for Philly of course.

We are doing a fried turkey but I think I am going to smoke some sea salt and use that in the brine to see if it gets a good smoky flavor inside the meat.
Hi..I do the brine in a bucket or cooler method too, seeing as I have a 35º unheated garage most of the winter. I have a cooler that works also. I make a concentrated brine, just enough to melt the salt and sugar, then add the bird and top it with cold water and ice. Works for me..nice seeing how everyone else does it.  Pam   .☆´¯`•.¸¸. ི♥ྀ.
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Offline teesquare

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #19 on: November 10, 2014, 09:53:04 AM »
I think one of our strengths here ( LTBBQ ) is that we share different methods - without the need of "ego" getting in the way. No one method is the best for everyone all of the time. It is nice to learn and expand our flexibility so that we can adapt our cooking skills to changing circumstance.

Whether it be more birthdays causing us to change something, or perhaps we are visiting our kids and find ourselves without our "old tried and true" equipment/methods - know more ways to accomplish the same or similar results is just smart.

Really good thread! In fact...I am going to move this to the Poultry section - and make it a sticky. If you have additional ideas to share - PLEASE add them to the thread.

T
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Offline akruckus

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2014, 06:32:55 AM »
In the past I have used a food grade 5 gallon bucket and loaded it with ice, or used a smaller cooler with ice as well.  There has always still been ice in the bucket when I get the turkey the next day day and a half.  Usually sits in the garage to keep it cool as well, depending on the weather forecast for Philly of course.

We are doing a fried turkey but I think I am going to smoke some sea salt and use that in the brine to see if it gets a good smoky flavor inside the meat.
Hi..I do the brine in a bucket or cooler method too, seeing as I have a 35º unheated garage most of the winter. I have a cooler that works also. I make a concentrated brine, just enough to melt the salt and sugar, then add the bird and top it with cold water and ice. Works for me..nice seeing how everyone else does it.  Pam   .☆´¯`•.¸¸. ི♥ྀ.

Unheated garage, the only way we are able to keep everything cold for holiday meals! Sometimes 2 fridges don't have the room for everyday life, beer, and prepped foods for the holidays!  :P
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Offline 1Bigg_ER

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #21 on: November 11, 2014, 11:09:09 PM »
I used to brine a lot, I stopped. Now I just salt any meat 1 to days in advance.
Let that salt work its way deep deep into the meat! YUM!!
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Offline CaptJack

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #22 on: November 14, 2014, 03:32:50 PM »
to know: Reynolds has discontinued their Easy Brining bags
but you can use their turkey Oven bags to brine in as well (2 per box)
but if you want the original brining bag (they are a little bigger)

Thank you for your inquiry regarding the availability of Reynolds® Easy Brining Bag. We are always happy to hear from our consumers.
Unfortunately due to low consumer demand, the company has decided to discontinue this product.
There is another option available to consumers whereby they may contact “MyBrands, Inc.®” which is a company that distributes products that are hard to find at the local grocer, available to consumers.
Regards,
Jim, The Reynolds Kitchens


you have to buy a minimum of 4 @ $3.83 per bag
http://mybrands.com/Brands/Reynolds/Reynolds-Easy-Brining-Bag-1ct




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Offline CaptJack

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2014, 01:18:44 PM »
here's a 7# bone-on turkey breast i'm brining.
i'm using one of the Reynolds Oven Bags (to-24#) to brine in.
the brine is 2/3cup salt, 1/3cup sugar, some ground spices, to 1quart water, boiled, cooled, 1quart orange juice.
a little water to bring it up to about 2.1/2qts total liquid.

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Offline TentHunteR

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #24 on: November 21, 2014, 03:17:49 AM »
... It IS a certified Kosher salt!  No additives, anti-caking agents, etc.

Cliff -

You're absolutely correct (as most always) but you're leaving room for confusion (never a good thing around tee, dee, or me).

What we usually refer to as "kosher salt" is actually "koshering salt" because the crystal shape (flake or hollow pyramid) and size were better than other styles for absorbing blood in preparing kosher meat.

"Kosher-certified salt," however, is any salt that has been certified as usable in preparing kosher food. In theory, it can have any crystal shape or size as long as it is produced and handled according to kosher dietary requirements.

I'm guessing that on this forum (with it's preference for pork), that certification is not much of an issue.


Paul, yes, I should clarify a little better why "Certified Kosher" is what's important for brining.

As the turtle points out, there are two purposes for Kosher Salt; It's made for "Koshering" (salting meat to draw out blood then rinsing), AND it's made to be a clean, or "pure" salt in accordance with "Kosher" dietary laws.




► Koshering process: The structure of the salt matters.

"Koshering" salt's flake structure allows it to stick to the meat, without dissolving into the meat, allowing it to be rinsed away with any blood it draws out.


► Brining: The structure of the salt does NOT matter.

Once it's dissolved, salt looses it's crystalline structure.


For brining/pickling it's the "pure" quality of the salt we are after, but not because of Kosher dietary laws.  "Certified Kosher" salt is a clean salt with no additives, such as anti-caking agents (which do not dissolve) or iodine (which can affect the flavor & quality).




► One more important note: Straight tap water should really be boiled to kill pathogens and remove chlorine, then allowed to cool before using it to brine.

One advantage with pickling salt is that because it's made to dissolve easily, you can use filtered or distilled water and bypass boiling.




Hopefully this makes better sense! :)


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Offline CaptJack

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2014, 11:07:03 PM »


Wish-Bone’s Brining 101 gives you a simple way to keep your turkey juicy.

Ingredients:
1 (12 to 16 lb.) turkey
2 bottles (16 oz. ea.) Wish-Bone® Italian or Robusto Italian Dressing
1 can (14.5 oz.) chicken broth
Large food-safe plastic bag or large deep non-metallic container
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Offline viscera912

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Re: Brining Poultry
« Reply #26 on: November 19, 2015, 12:05:36 AM »
excellent information, i had to come back here to prep for next week!!!!